10 Books to Read in 2014

Written on December 18, 2013 at 4:16 pm , by

Whether you’re looking for one good novel or want to cozy up to a stack, Family Circle rounded up some of the New Year’s most promising releases.

 

In the Blood

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1). In the Blood (Touchstone) by Lisa Unger
A disturbing past keeps college student Lana hiding in the shadows of her life. But when her best friend goes missing, she finds herself caught in her own web of deception. A riveting chess match of twists will keep you guessing—and keep you up at night.

Before We Met

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2). Before We Met (Bloomsbury) by Lucie Whitehouse
Newly married Hannah thinks she knows her husband, Mark, until the night he doesn’t arrive home and she realizes nothing is what it seemed. Even when you think you’ve figured it out, this one is hard to put down.

 

Golden State

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3). Golden State (Bantam) by Michelle Richmond
A stirring look at the ties that bind husband-wife, mother-child and even sisters, and what happens when they’re torn asunder. Set in a San Francisco chafing with unrest both political and personal, the world Richmond creates is exquisitely charged with regret and hope.

 

Mercy Snow

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4). Mercy Snow (Grand Central) by Tiffany Baker
A school bus accident unearths a long-buried secret in the struggling mill town of Titan Falls. Baker is masterful at creating elegantly flawed characters who are both believably ordinary and extraordinary.

 

The Museum of Extraordinary Things

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5). The Museum of Extraordinary Things (Scribner) by Alice Hoffman
This promises to be classic Hoffman: a bewitching world of time and place (in this case, Coney Island and its boardwalk freak show in the early 1900s) suffused with magical moments, a mysterious disappearance and romance.

 

The Perfect Score Project

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6). The Perfect Score Project (Harmony) by Debbie Stier
It’s hard to resist a mom who puts her money—or, in this case, her No. 2 pencil—where her mouth is. Hoping to inspire her not-so- motivated son, Stier vows to learn all she can about the SATs by submitting to the testing ordeal, over and over again.

 

Steal These Books—From Your Kid’s Shelf

Check out what’s crossing over from the children’s and YA (young adult) worlds.

Allegiant

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7.) Allegiant (Katherine Tegen Books)by Veronica Roth
The last book in this dystopian Divergent trilogy promises to garner even more grown-up fans when the movie of the first book comes out this spring.

 

The Impossible Knife of Memory

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.) The Impossible Knife of Memory (Viking) by Laurie Halse Anderson
Anderson has been lauded and awarded for her ability to channel the teenage mind (and heart) dealing with tough issues. Here, she takes on PTSD through the story of a girl coping with her troubled veteran dad.

 

The Book Thief

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9.) The Book Thief (Knopf Books) by Markus Zusak
Set in World War II Germany and technically written for teens, this exquisitely crafted book has been a nearly perennial best seller since its release.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10.) The House of Hades (Disney-Hyperion) by Rick Riordan
There is no age requirement for relishing the mythological fun of this book, written by Riordan of Percy Jackson fame.

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8 Comments

8 Responses to “10 Books to Read in 2014”

  1. I applaud this list, but the description for GOLDEN STATE needs a proofreader. I, for one, am dying to read this as I love Michelle Richmond’s last two novels, but the description here makes absolutely no sense at all.

  2. Lori is correct!!

  3. The weird sentence (I think) should read: Set in a San Francisco chafing with both political and personal unrest, the world Richmond creates is exquisitely charged with regret and hope.

  4. Thank you – now I might be interested in reading Golden State.

  5. Best read in 2013 — Defending Jacob

  6. There’s nothing wrong with “chafing with unrest both political and personal.” It’s perfectly fine as is.

  7. Enjoyed the new adult picks, but all but one of your YA picks are decidedly not new – would love to see more buzz from that age group.

  8. Really? These are books for grown women? With brains or without? What a pile of crap!